Oil and Filter change

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warpc0il
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Oil and Filter change

Post by warpc0il » Wed May 01, 2013 11:30 pm

Having recently changed my oil and filter, as I do every 6 months or 6k miles, I thought I’d share with you some of my tips to make the job as easy and efficient as possible.

Start with the engine really hot. Take the car for a minimum 10 mile drive and when you get back don’t switch off but leave the engine idling. You want it to get so hot that the fans cut-in.

This ensures that the oil has been strongly circulated, is as runny as possible and has removed any remains of condensation.

Tip: I fit my 2nd mouse mat for the warm-up as this makes sure that there are no cold spots in the coolers.

For jobs that need underside access but don’t need the wheels removed, I much prefer ramps to jacks and axle-stands. Not those huge metal things that catch on the bodywork before the wheels engage and where the raised edges dig into the tyres, no, I mean the lightweight plastic stepped ramps sold for levelling motorhomes on camp sites.

ramps.JPG
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These ramps are nice and wide, can take over 2-tonnes, with a nice shallow angle and stepped levels that make them easy to drive up single-handed, though it helps to have someone just checking as you drive on.

With the engine still running, make sure you have all the necessary tools to hand;
- Old carpet or (better still) an offcut of vinyl cushion floor to lie on; give it a quick polish with some Pledge spray and it’s much better than any car creeper.
- Drain can: I use a cat litter tray with the litter (and the cat) removed – these are dead cheap in Tescos. Cheap (unused) cat litter is also good to clean-up oil spills.
- Socket for the drain plug; the OEM is 19mm but I have an aftermarket magnetic drain plug (strongly recommended) with a 14mm head.
mag_plug.JPG
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- A really long socket extension and/or all your socket extensions connected end-to-end. If you can get the ratchet handle out beyond the right-hand sill it makes it much easier. A UJ or wobble-extension directly on the back of the socket also ensure that the socket sits square on the head, while the rest of the extension is clear of the under-body.
wobble.JPG
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- An oil-filter removal tool.
filter_tool.jpg
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These aren’t expensive and are even free if you buy one or three filters from David Silver Spares (the Series 1 RX-8 uses the same filter as the ’94-97 Honda VFR750R – I know as I have one).
- Replacement drain plug washer
- New oil filter
- 5L of good quality oil, keep in the warm on cold days so it pours easier. I choose to use 10W40.
- Suction pump (optional)
- Empty oil can
- Funnel
- Old rags or paper towels
- Gloves or Dermashield (strongly recommend this stuff and might even look to doing a group buy soon)

Note; K&N do an oil filter for the car that has a hex section on the top “for easy removal”. There’s nothing else special about these filters and they are expensive. They are also often faked and some sellers list the wrong part number for the car. Just because the filter fits doesn’t mean it’s the right one, as the bypass pressure rating and the flowrate are also important. The correct K&N part numbers are (HP1008) for the Series 1 (both 192 & 231) and (HP1010) for the R3 – yes the filters are different, so if any supplier lists the same filter for the S1 and R3, buy from someone else.

Now you can switch the engine off and make sure that the handbrake is fully on.

Before undoing the drain plug, remove the oil filler cap. The main reason for this is to let air in as the oil escapes underneath. This makes a huge difference to the rate-of-flow and the faster is comes out the more it will wash any crap from the inside the engine and sump. It also ensures that you can undo the filler, as these can be over-tightened by previous owners or the gorillas in overalls. You don’t want to be wrestling with a jammed filler after you’ve already drained the oil.

Remove the drain plug, remembering that the oil should be coming out like hot water from a hose, so have most of the catch tray between the sump and the wheel.

Don’t get used oil on your bare hands as it’s carcinogenic (it gives you cancer) and is absorbed through the skin into the bloodstream. On a hot day you may think you can taste the oil, this isn’t just from the smell but sufficient oil will go through the skin to trigger your tastebuds.

When the flow slows to a trickle, slide the tray across towards the passenger side. You want it still catching the trickle but also ready to catch the oil that escapes when you undo the filter.

If you have hydraulic lifters on your bonnet then it will already be as high as it can go and there’s no prop in the way. If you don’t then a length of wood can be used as a temporary stay to get the bonnet those few extra inches higher; I’m told that a couple of extra inches can make all the difference.

Pop your removal tool onto the filter (which should still be hot) and undo with a socket extension – again a UJ or wobble-end makes it easier to get the ratchet clear of the bodywork.

The filter should only have been hand-tightened but gorillas have strong hands. It’s amazing how much force you can apply with the correct tool if necessary to undo.

Don’t be tempted to try any of the cowboy tricks for removing filters, like stabbing with a screwdriver. The sharp edges can cut right through the tendons in your hand and you won’t be able to grip anything ever again.

If the filter is tight, once you’ve got it moving, screw it back down again until the removal tool “clicks”; it will have jammed on the ‘undo’ edges and it’s much easier to release the tool at this point than trying to hammer the oil filter out of the tool later.

You did remember to slide the tray back didn’t you, as a cupful of oil has just run out of the filter, down the back of the engine and heading for the floor.

Tip: In addition to the magnetic drain plug I also use small high-power magnets stuck around the body of the filter. You can buy these (eBay etc) though mine came from stripping down old PC hard drives. These magnets are so strong that a pair 2mm thick by 10mm wide and 12mm long are powerful enough to hold a complete 10-22mm combination socket set in a plastic wallet, up on the wall of my garage. Anyway, they are more than strong enough to hold on the side of the filter (and can be a bugger to remove) while they also ensure that even the smallest ferrous particles in the circulated oil are trapped within the filter.

Now is a good time to prime the new filter by standing it on a flat surface and filling to the brim with clean oil. After 10 minutes or so the first fill will have disappeared, absorbed by the filter element, so refill again and leave to stand.

Most gorillas don’t bother with this step, as it’s not their car, but failure to do this means that the engine would run dry on the first restart and damage could be caused to the stationary bearing and/or the tips and housings as the OMP is pumping air. It has since been determined that the OMP has it's own reservoir, cast within the front housing, which is impossible to drain in-situ. This reservoir is kept topped-up by a tiny hole from the main oil feed. This means that the OMP wouldn't pump air until the reservoir had been emptied, which is a good thing, but also means there's even more reason to ensure that the oil in circulation is kept clean, as you wouldn't want that hole to get blocked :shock:

Dip your finger in the clean oil and wipe around the rubber seal, for lubrication when fitting. This ensures that even hand-tight won’t leak.

Now we get to the optional part…

Most of you will know that only around 55% of the oil in circulation will drain from the sump plug, due to the arrangement of the oil coolers and hoses.

I like to remove as much as possible but don’t like disturbing the oil cooler connections, as these can leak or even break.

To maximise the old oil extracted I use a cheap vacuum pump that comes with a thin hose, perfect for feeding down the dipstick tube. When you remove your dipstick you may fine a loose plastic sleeve inside the tube. This was Mazda’s first attempt to prevent condensation and mayo on the dipstick. It doesn’t really work but don’t leave it out as those with the tube also have a thinner dipstick, which rattles in the tube if the liner is removed.

Anyway, with the suction pipe down the dipstick tube and the outflow pipe in the neck of an empty oil can, it only takes a few pumps to remove at least another one to two litres of old oil (okay, my record is 1.8L). This makes a significant difference to the purity of the oil in circulation after the change.

Now would be a good time to refit the sump plug. Replacing with a magnetic one if there’s not one already (R3’s have a mag plug as standard – proving that Mazda can learn sometimes).

Wipe the plug clean before fitting and inspect the crush washer.
If the washer is distorted or damaged then replace, otherwise I just reuse.

The sump plug only has to be tightened to (check manual) which isn’t a lot.

Over-tightening (remember those gorillas) will damage the washer and cause leaks; in the extreme it can strip the thread or distort the sump pan.

Leave the catch tray underneath at this stage, until you’ve got the new filter in place, which is the next job.

Even, after two priming fills, the new filter should appear nearly empty, at least empty enough to invert and screw in place without much spilling out.

Just before you fit the filter, give the mating surface of the housing and the thread a quick wipe with a clean rag to remove any grit.

Locate the filter onto the thread by hand and spin it down the thread. If there’s any resistance before the seal makes contact, remove and check again that the thread is clean.

Remember that the filter should only be hand-tight. If over-tightened, the seal can be damaged and later fail in service, or the whole body of the filter can be distorted causing the pressure bypass mechanism to stick open (so no oil gets filtered) or closed (so the engine is starved of oil if the filter gets blocked).

If you have difficulty getting a good grip with your hand, wipe the filter clean then grip with a damp cloth. If your hands are too large to get in to the filter, or too small to grip around it, then you can use the removal tool to very gently tighten. If the tool grabs the filter then you did it too much.

Pour the oil from the drain tray into the empty oil can. This will give you a good idea just how much oil was removed and therefore how much to refill.

If you want, you can weigh the can empty and weigh it again with the old oil, working on the oil being 0.9kg per litre. The main thing at this stage is to underestimate rather than overestimate. Two litres below the maximum won’t do any harm, while 0.2 litres over the maximum will be enough to blow oil into the intake system and cause problems.

Always use a funnel when adding oil, to ensure that it gets delivered way down the neck of the filler and can’t run into the breather pipes that join to the filler neck. This is especially necessary on the earlier (pre’06) cars, but can still be an issue on the later Series 1’s and R3, if you pour the oil too quickly.

Replace the filler cap and the dipstick.

Having added the initial fill, clear the tools away, start the engine and park on a flat, level surface. Once the temperature needle moves off the stop you can give it a couple of quick blips to burp any remaining air from the filter. It shouldn’t take long before the temperature is back to normal and you can switch off.

Wait 10 minutes for the oil level to settle and then pull the dipstick, wipe and check the level. With the oil nice and clean it can be difficult to see exactly where it is against the markings. Resting the back of the stick against a clean tissue makes the level more obvious.

Remember that the MAX mark on the dipstick is the maximum, not the target when filling or topping-up between changes. I always aim for the top dot below the Max.

When adding oil only add 250ml at a time and wait 5 minutes before rechecking.

If you get ahead of yourself and end up higher than the Max, you can use the vacuum pump to withdraw the excess; don’t be tempted to run the engine overfilled.

If this was the first oil change since you acquired your car, and it didn’t come from a trusted member of the OC, I recommend that you replace the oil again within the next 10 to 100 miles. It shouldn’t be necessary to fit another new filter but two changes in quick succession is a best way to replace as much as possible of the old (unknown quality) oil with new. It’s the only method approved by Mazda, who instruct their dealers not to interfere with the oil cooler lines and not to use any “engine flush” type products.

Hopefully even those of you that do your own servicing will get some benefit from this and I hope that those that haven’t so far will be prepared to use this, to at least do an interim change between scheduled services. Even without replacing the filter, an interim change midway between the 12k miles or 12 months, normal oil and filter change, should be beneficial to the engine and won’t interfere with any warranty.

All the above is my initial brain-dump and I will be returning later to add some pictures and links as appropriate.
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Re: Oil and Filter change

Post by warpc0il » Fri Sep 20, 2013 12:28 am

Dave
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Re: Oil and Filter change

Post by lawtom » Mon Feb 10, 2014 8:49 pm

Hi Dave, is this the cheap kind of pump that you use down the dipstick tube?
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Hand-Syphon-P ... 19e866aa54

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Re: Oil and Filter change

Post by warpc0il » Tue Feb 11, 2014 12:37 am

No, I use this one
Image
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Re: Oil and Filter change

Post by Markryan1981 » Mon Nov 10, 2014 5:36 pm

Damn it, I can't find the specification of the removal tool cup #-o - would it be the smallest one of these: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/261313085689 ? :study:
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Re: Oil and Filter change

Post by MARKTHOMASBRAND » Mon Nov 10, 2014 10:12 pm

Hi Mark,

You could always buy one of these filters and get the removal tool with it as Dave posted above :thumleft:

:arrow: Click here

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Re: Oil and Filter change

Post by SeanP » Thu Mar 12, 2015 8:46 pm

I'm biting the bullet and doing all the between service oil changes myself! Gulp!

I got one of those draper drip-cans, which can be used to transport the used oil to the "dump". Maybe a mistake now I read about measuring the used oil into a can... BUT I supose I could use the "weighing" method!

R3 Question time:

Dave, from that website (that does the motorcycle filters + tool)... Is there an R3 equivalent?

I think the R3 filter is in a different location; do you know how much that alters the requirement of socket extension, and / or positioning of the catch tray?

What size are the crush washer - is there a difference between the "copper" and "aluminium" ones I see on eBay? Best place to purchase? Do they vary for the R3?
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Re: Oil and Filter change

Post by R6yamaha37 » Thu Apr 23, 2015 7:21 am

Bit of a dumb question (possibly) but where is the oil filter located on a R3, watched loads of you tube clips, but they must all be S1 as mine is not located where they are??? :oops:

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Re: Oil and Filter change

Post by acegeezer » Thu Apr 23, 2015 7:26 am

Chris, it's inside the tray under the car, (you can't see it) you need to remove the tray first.. then look towards the front of the engine.. a bit tight to get at removal wise too ;)
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Re: Oil and Filter change

Post by SteveD » Thu Apr 23, 2015 7:31 am

Here ya go:
R3_oil.pdf
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Re: Oil and Filter change

Post by R6yamaha37 » Thu Apr 23, 2015 7:48 am

Thanks guys, no wonder I couldn't find it! Don't feel quite so dumb now! :D

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Re: Oil and Filter change

Post by kopite72 » Thu Apr 23, 2015 8:39 am

acegeezer wrote:Chris, it's inside the tray under the car, (you can't see it) you need to remove the tray first.. then look towards the front of the engine.. a bit tight to get at removal wise too ;)
Couldn't agree more John,it's an absolute pain trying to access it without a lift,I use my pela for oil changes but the location of the filter is a nightmare :roll: plus if its on tight the aggression level goes through the roof!! Wish it was in the top of the engine but hey ho.....
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Re: Oil and Filter change

Post by acegeezer » Thu Apr 23, 2015 8:43 am

The old screw driver usage then, Ian.. might be worth investing in the filter removal tool :lol:
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Re: Oil and Filter change

Post by kopite72 » Thu Apr 23, 2015 8:46 am

True John,tbf I've always gotten it off but the last time I changed the filter the bitch fought me all the way!!! :evil:
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Re: Oil and Filter change

Post by sKenDread » Tue Jul 09, 2019 4:22 pm

Just did an oil change and found the filter a bugger to remove. I've always done the screw driver and hammer thing if I couldn't get to the bugger.

Thought I'd try a cable wrap trick. It works perfectly.

Clean the filter of any residue so it's got some grip.

Use a good length of electrical wire. Something sturdy like the mrs extension cable to her hair dryer.

Wrap that around the filter twice taking care not to overlay the wrap.

Then remember righty tighty lefty Lucy.

Pull both ends so they are tight and not slipping. And pull the left end so the whole filter spins anti clockwise.

It will come loose. But don't pull on both ends too hard. You only need tension for the Mrs cable to grip onto the filter.

After that. Check the cable hasn't been stretched. Clean it to remove any traces of evidence. Spray with the Mrs perfume and sneak back into her changing room.

Job done.

Note if you buggered the Mrs extension cable. I take no responsibility for your actions
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