Service Schedule

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warpc0il
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Service Schedule

Post by warpc0il » Sat Jan 15, 2011 10:58 pm

This is the service schedule required for EUROPEAN Series 1 (2003-08) models.

Year 1
Interval 12 Months or 12,500miles

To be Changed
Engine Oil
Oil Filter

To be Inspected
Drive Belts
Battery Electrolyte Level and Specific Gravity
Brake Lines, Hoses and Connectors
Parking Brake
Power Brake Unit and Hoses
Disc Brakes
Body Condition
Tyre Repair Kit

Year 2
Interval 24 Months or 25,000miles

To be Changed
Engine Oil
Oil Filter
Brake Fluid
Cabin Pollen Filter

To be Inspected
Drive Belts
Cooling System
Fuel Lines, Hoses (include Canister hose) and Connections
Battery Electrolyte Level and Specific Gravity
Brake Lines, Hoses and Connectors
Parking Brake
Power Brake Unit and Hoses
Disc Brakes
Steering Operation and Linkage
Front and Read Suspension and Ball Joints
Drive Shaft Dust Boots
Bolts and Nuts on Seats
Body Condition
Exhaust System Heat Shields
Tyre Repair Kit

Year 3
Interval 36 Months or 37,500miles

To be Changed
Engine Oil
Oil Filter
Air Filter
Spark Plugs
Rear Differential Oil

To be Inspected
Drive Belts
Battery Electrolyte Level and Specific Gravity
Brake Lines, Hoses and Connectors
Parking Brake
Power Brake Unit and Hoses
Disc Brakes
Body Condition
Tyre Repair Kit

Year 4
Interval 48 Months or 50’000miles

To be Changed
Engine Oil
Oil Filter
Coolant (if non FL22 anti freeze)
Brake Fluid
Cabin Pollen Filter

To be Inspected
Drive Belts
Cooling System
Fuel Lines, Hoses (include Canister hose) and Connections
Battery Electrolyte Level and Specific Gravity
Brake Lines, Hoses and Connectors
Parking Brake
Power Brake Unit and Hoses
Disc Brakes
Steering Operation and Linkage
Front and Read Suspension and Ball Joints
Drive Shaft Dust Boots
Bolts and Nuts on Seats
Body Condition
Exhaust System Heat Shields
Tyre Repair Kit

Year 5
Interval 60 Months or 62,500miles

To be Changed
Engine Oil
Oil Filter
Manual Transmission Oil

To be Inspected
Drive Belts
Evaporative System
Battery Electrolyte Level and Specific Gravity
Brake Lines, Hoses and Connectors
Parking Brake
Power Brake Unit and Hoses
Disc Brakes
Body Condition
Tyre Repair Kit


Year 6
Interval 72 Months or 75,000miles

To be Changed
Engine Oil
Oil Filter
Coolant (non FL22 coolant - FL22 every 11 years/125K miles)
Air Filter
Spark Plugs
Brake Fluid
Rear Differential Oil
Cabin Pollen Filter

To be Inspected
Drive Belts
Cooling System
Fuel Lines, Hoses (include Canister hose) and Connections
Battery Electrolyte Level and Specific Gravity
Brake Lines, Hoses and Connectors
Parking Brake
Power Brake Unit and Hoses
Disc Brakes
Steering Operation and Linkage
Front and Read Suspension and Ball Joints
Drive Shaft Dust Boots
Bolts and Nuts on Seats
Body Condition
Exhaust System Heat Shields
Tyre Repair Kit

Year 7
Interval 84 Months or 87,500miles

To be Changed
Engine Oil
Oil Filter

To be Inspected
Drive Belts
Battery Electrolyte Level and Specific Gravity
Brake Lines, Hoses and Connectors
Parking Brake
Power Brake Unit and Hoses
Disc Brakes
Body Condition
Tyre Repair Kit

Year 8
Interval 96 Months or 100,000miles

To be Changed
Engine Oil
Oil Filter
Coolant - (FL22 is 11 years life)
Brake Fluid
Cabin Pollen Filter

To be Inspected
Drive Belts
Cooling System
Fuel Lines, Hoses (include Canister hose) and Connections
Battery Electrolyte Level and Specific Gravity
Brake Lines, Hoses and Connectors
Parking Brake
Power Brake Unit and Hoses
Disc Brakes
Steering Operation and Linkage
Front and Read Suspension and Ball Joints
Drive Shaft Dust Boots
Bolts and Nuts on Seats
Body Condition
Exhaust System Heat Shields
Tyre Repair Kit

Year 9
Interval 108 Months or 112,500miles

To be Changed
Engine Oil
Oil Filter
Air Filter
Spark Plugs
Rear Differential Oil

To be Inspected
Drive Belts
Battery Electrolyte Level and Specific Gravity
Brake Lines, Hoses and Connectors
Parking Brake
Power Brake Unit and Hoses
Disc Brakes
Body Condition
Tyre Repair Kit


This is the official table from the back of the owners manual section 8-4 and 8-5
Typing courtesy of Aston [Arnie_O]

See here for DIY on Engine Oil and Filter change
Dave
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Re: Service Schedule

Post by warpc0il » Mon Apr 16, 2012 1:30 pm

It should be noted that this Service Schedule is the same as that recommended for markets which don't fit dual (or even single) oil coolers as standard.

Mazda UK choose to include the dual oil coolers for marketing rather than engineering reasons.

While they can keep the oil (and therefore the engine) from overheating in extreme conditions, such as trackday sessions or hard driving in very hot weather, there are two downsides to having them installed.

Firstly, they almost double the quantity of oil in circulation, which isn't in itself a bad thing, but it means that only 55% of the oil is drained and replaced at each oil change, the coolers being lower than the sump and having no separate drain.

Mazda's published (to their dealers) process for changing contaminated oil is to change it twice, running the engine to normal temperature in between; though this would still only replace ~75% of the original oil (half left the first time then half of that left the second time).

My recommendation is to follow that process the first time you change the oil on a used car, especially if the service history is unknown and/or the drained oil is particularly black.

Subsequent changes can either be on the 12.5k mile or 12 month schedule, repeating as above, or much better still to just change the oil every 6k miles or 6 months.



The second disadvantage is that the oil is constantly being circulated through the coolers, there being no thermostat preventing this, unlike the water coolant radiator.

This means that engine warm-up is significantly delayed as chilled oil is being returned from the coolers. Delayed warm-up is bad for the engine, the cat, fuel consumption, heater performance and means that you have to wait much longer each journey before you can safely use the higher rev band, let alone beep.

There is no obvious way to include an oil thermostat in the system, without potentially causing other issues such as old oil being trapped in the cooler matrix.

I have been experimenting with restricting the airflow through the coolers, as reported in other thread in this forum, and my results have been very positive.

In cold weather, say less than 5°C, the oil coolers are totally redundant and only the disadvantages listed above apply. In fact, unless you are making long journeys and/or driving hard or stuck for extended periods in stationary traffic, the oil doesn't get hot enough to dry-out any water condensation and this is why we see mayo on the dipstick in winter.

In warm weather, the coolers can help if you are driving hard, once the engine is up to normal temperature. However, the cooler capacity is still too great and that warm-up is still overly extended.

In really hot weather, the coolers will help maintain a reasonable engine temperature if you are driving hard but, since they have no fans, don't make any real difference when you are just stuck in traffic.

Based on this, I have taken to blanking-off the airflow to both coolers in cold weather, blanking one cooler in warm weather, and only opening the air to both coolers in high summer or for track days.

The results have been very positive with up to an 80% reduction in engine warm-up times, more consistent engine temperatures during a journey and no increase in the instances of the radiator fans being demanded. I now don't get any mayo on the dipstick so the oil is clearly being run at the temperature it was designed to operate. My fuel economy (if you can use that phrase on a Rex) has also improved but there are too many other variables to be able to define a percentage that is down to this mod.

My choice of blanking material may sound a little strange but it has its advantages...

I use a pair of DELL mouse mats, the small thin ones that come free with a DELL system, that are a blue fabric bonded to a diamond-pattern rubber.

They are the perfect size and shape to tuck through the cooler apertures in the bumper and spread across the face of the cooler matrix within its rubber housing.

Black-side out the diamond pattern looks very OEM and they are easy to fit and remove while being secure in all conditions. The rubber is closed-cell so doesn't absorb water and the material is soft enough to guarantee no damage to the matrix. They also provide great protection against damage from flying stones.

Any rubbery sheeting should work, it just needs to be the right shape and able to be folded-up to fix in place while stiff enough to stay put without any additional support.

If you decide to try this for yourself I'm sure you will be pleasantly surprised by how much quicker the engine gets to normal running temperature but I would also recommend that you keep an eye on the temperature gauge, at least for the first few journeys, just in case there is a fault in your cooling system (e.g. blocked radiator, stuck thermostat, seized fan...) that could have been masked by the oil cooling.
Dave
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User avatar
warpc0il
Spin Doctor
Spin Doctor
Posts: 25570
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 10:56 pm
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Re: Service Schedule

Post by warpc0il » Sat Sep 07, 2013 2:30 pm

A DIY article is now available on The Mousemat Mod©
Dave
The Spin Doctor ™
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